Animations

Simulators aren't the only ones who can make cool animations...right?


TWA 3A

An animation of the mass accretion rate onto the binary system TWA 3A as a function of orbital phase.

TWA 3A is a young binary star system that is actively accreting material from a protoplanetary disk that surrounds the two stars. Hydrodynamic simulations of the binary-disk interaction predict bursts of accretion near each periastron passage (the closest approach of the two stars in their orbit). TWA 3A has an orbital period of 34.9 days and an eccentricity of 0.63.

The left panel displays the accretion rate as a function of an arbitrarily labeled orbital cycle number. Dashed vertical lines mark TWA 3A’s periastron passage.

The right panel displays a scale schematic of TWA 3A’s orbit as the two stars travel through their orbits.

Mass accretion rates are measured from a photometric excess in the Johnson U-band. Observations were made with the Las Cumbres Observatories 1m telescope network.

A peer-reviewed article published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters on this result can be found here.


DQ Tau

An animation of the mass accretion rate onto DQ Tau as a function of orbital phase.

DQ Tau is a young binary star system that is actively accreting material from its protoplanetary disk. Hydrodynamic simulations of the binary-disk interaction predict bursts of accretion near each periastron passage (the closest approach of the two stars in their orbit). DQ Tau has an orbital period of 15.8 days and an eccentricity of 0.57.

The left panel displays the accretion rate as a function of an arbitrarily labeled orbital cycle number. Dashed vertical lines mark DQ Tau’s periastron passage.

The right panel displays a scale schematic of DQ Tau’s orbit as the two stars travel through their orbits.

Mass accretion rates are measured from a photometric excess in the Johnson U-band. Observations were made with the Las Cumbres Observatories 1m telescope network, the Apache Point Observatory’s ARCSAT telescope, and the WIYN 0.9m telescope.

A peer-reviewed article published in the Astrophysical Journal on this result can be found here.


More fun animations I have made for grad classes over the years can be found on my youtube channel.